Rhubarb fool you once, no shame on you. Rhubarb fool you twice….

Rhubarb FoolYes, I am fooling around again. Earlier in the year, I gave rhubarb fool a go. I liked it but there were a couple of niggles. My previous rhubarb fool was pretty tasty, pretty good in all respects.  But, perhaps it could have been lighter, Perhaps it could have been rhubarbier (new word). Perhaps I need to completely rethink the idea of the fool. So, it’s time to fool you twice, if you don’t mind.

My ingredients shot has something additional to last time. Eggs.

Another short ingredients list. Either I am honing things or getting lazy.

Another short ingredients list. Either I am honing things or getting lazy.

It doesn’t even qualify as a list. A kilo of rhubarb, a quarter kilo of caster sugar, 2 eggs and half a litre of cream (lactose free in this case).

The instructions are simple too. Chop the rhubarb and put it in a pot with a little water.  Add the sugar.

Rhubarb needs plenty of sugar to take the bitter edge off. Get it right and it is bitter-sweet, literally.

Rhubarb needs plenty of sugar to take the bitter edge off. Get it right and it is bitter-sweet, literally.

Bring it to the boil. Cook until the rhubarb breaks down. Now comes the beginning of the big difference. Let it cool and put it through a sieve. Keep both the pulp and the juice.

Here's where traditional fools and me part company.

Here’s where traditional fools and I part company.

Whip the whites of two eggs.

The egg whites add a lovely light touch to this dessert.

The egg whites add a lovely light touch to this dessert. Light, and classy. No fooling.

Whip the half litre of cream.

A nice moody cream pouring shot to prove it's better class.

A nice moody cream pouring shot to show that I’m really not fooling around.

Fold the eggs into the cream then fold most of the rhubarb juice into the mixture, reserving some for pouring. Do it gently to stop the air escaping from the egg and cream.

Side note of elucidation: The word ‘fool’ comes, like so many other words, from something Latin. It refers to being full of air or a windbag. In this case, the dessert is full of air. 

The resulting colour is very delicate, as is the fool.

The resulting colour is very delicate, as is the fool.

Next place the pulp at the centre of a serving bowl. Spoon the fool mixture gently over this. Spoon it out, serve it and don’t forget to pour some of that delicious rhubarb sauce over the top.

Fooled ye twice!

Fooled ye twice!

I hope you don’t mind my fooling you twice. It is a new twist on an old fool. Try it. It’s simple and very, very tasty. No fooling. Now, you have heard enough from this particular windbag.

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Latest comments
  • I have never had a fool but by the looks of yours, I would love it. Very pretty fool, Conor! (No pun intended… 🙂 )

    • Thanks Lidia, It is a really light, tasty dessert. Delicious, if i say so myself.

  • No fooling around – this sounds great. Foolishly, I’ve been hesitant about rhubarb, but I don’t think I’ve ever sweetened it properly. Now I know.

    • Get in there Tommy. It is really delicious.

  • Again it looks really delicious!

  • Looks delicious, better than your two previous fools. It must have something with it being more rhubarbier.

  • Love fruit fools: just about the only dessert I do eat !! But admit I do have to make my own life rhubarbier 🙂 ! I have a tendency to the red and black currant and apple ones of my childhood!!

    • Give it a go Eha. The rhubarb is worthy.

  • Okay, time to make fool. I have always wanted to and now there are no excuses. Photographs are incredible!! As usual!

    • Thanks, taking them in the garden helps with the light.

  • Sounds delicious, Conor. You got some great pouring shots.

    • Thanks Richard, it’s done with 50% less crew than you have in the kitchen.
      Best,
      Conor

  • I never had this – looks really good!

    • Give it a go Bernice. It really is easy and tasty.

  • Rhubarb fool was one of the very first recipes we published in our blog. And leftover rhubarb purée is a treat on toast or over yogurt. This looks and sounds great. Fool on! Ken

    • No problem continuing to fool, Ken. Making sense of it is the problem.

  • I used to condemn the rhubarb up until this year. Was I fool or what?! It has a delicate taste behind the teeth clenching sourness. Like you, I do like the pulp…it is a shame to through it out.
    Lovely dish!

    • If one gets the sugar balance right, it is really beautiful.

  • Do a post on using Rhubarb leaves in a salad for the mother in law…

    Kind Regards,

    Wes D’Arcy

    2gether Studios Suite 103 Beacon Hub Bracken Road Sandyford Dublin 18 Ireland

    Head Office: +353 1 293 9463 Aus Mobile: +61 410 062 887

    • Are you trying to get me in trouble Wes? She’s far too nice a lady for that.

  • Hahaaa! I love your sense of humour Conor. This recipe looks gorgeous. There’s nothing like rhubarb on a cold night, particularly when cooked so beautifully. Yum!

    • Thanks Laura,
      It was pretty tasty indeed.

  • I made it with home grown rhubarb! divine dessert! Super yummy too! x

    • Hi Sophie,
      Thanks so much for the visit and for so many post likes. We used to have rhubarb in our garden (when I was a kid). Nothing like home grown, for sure.
      Best,
      Conor

      • Bye bye from a foodie from Belgium! 🙂

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